No Fee, If No Recovery

We represent workers across the U.S. on a contingent fee basis. We only get paid if you get paid.

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10 Things You Should Know

1. Common Overtime Violations
2. You CAN Afford to Hire a Lawyer
  • We handle cases on a contingent fee basis – no fee if no recovery.
3. Double Back Pay
  • You can recover up to double your unpaid overtime wages plus attorneys’ fees.
4. Strict Time Limits Apply
  • Federal law limits recovery of back overtime wages to the 2 to 3 year period prior to the date a claim is filed. Some states have longer time limits.
5. Claim Reviews are Confidential
  • Our review of your potential claim is free and strictly confidential. We will not contact your employer as part of our review.
6. You Can’t Sign Away Your Right to Overtime Pay
  • Your overtime pay rights can’t be given up by signing a contract or by agreeing to be paid straight time only or a flat day rate.
  • If you are owed overtime pay, overtime pay laws in your state allow you to seek lost wages from your employer, regardless of any prior agreement.
7. Employers must Comply with State AND Federal Overtime Laws
  • Many states have enacted overtime laws which are more favorable to workers than federal law – such as daily overtime pay. Employers must comply with whichever law is more beneficial to workers.
8. Do Not Rely on your Boss or HR Department
  • Employers often give inaccurate information about overtime pay laws and aren’t looking out for your best interest. The overtime laws are complex. If you are not paid time and a half after 40 hours, you should contact us for a free, confidential review.
9. Most Employers are Not in Compliance
  • According to the Department of Labor, up to 70% of employers are NOT in compliance with the overtime laws. If you are not being paid time and a half after 40, you should have your situation reviewed.
10. Courthouse Doors are Closing
  • Employers are rushing to force employees to sign arbitration agreements that prevent employees from bringing cases as a group or class action.
  • If you’ve signed an arbitration agreement, you can still pursue your overtime claim but it’s important to have your situation reviewed so you can know your options.

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