fbpx

Stop Changes to Independent Contractor Rules that Harm U.S. Workers

We are reposting and sharing this vital information from Economic Policy Institute and National Employment Law Project. American workers’ wage and overtime rights are at risk, and we encourage workers to share their comments with the Department of Labor.  

The Trump administration is attempting to make it even easier for employers to classify employees as independent contractors, cheating workers out of wages and benefits. Instead of protecting workers, the Department of Labor is doing the bidding of corporations.

Workers including construction workers, janitors, home care workers, and those deemed “essential workers” during the COVID-19 pandemic, who clean homes, care for children and elderly individuals, and deliver groceries must not be left to earn subminimum wages and work more than 40 hours per week without getting any overtime pay.

Submit a comment to the U.S. Department of Labor to stop employers from cheating workers out of wages and benefits

The Trump administration has introduced a proposed rule change that would make it even easier for employers to classify workers as independent contractors, cheating their workers of minimum wage and overtime protections. 

This proposed rule change would give employers and corporations far more leeway in classifying their workers as independent contractors—allowing them to pay subminimum wages, hire child labor, and avoid overtime pay. 

Together, we must stop the Trump administration from undermining the labor protections that have taken generations to build. 

This proposed rule, which ignores the clear language of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and decades of court rulings (including by the U.S. Supreme Court)—would hurt the very workers who have been organizing on the frontlines for better wages and more protections, including construction workers, janitors, home care workers, and those deemed “essential workers” during the COVID-19 pandemic, who clean homes, care for children and elderly individuals, and deliver groceries.   

These workers must not be left to earn subminimum wages and work more than 40 hours per week without getting any overtime pay. 

Submit an official comment to the Department of Labor to fight on behalf of working people throughout our country for better pay and economic security. This DOL proposal sets the stage for a race to the bottom that could end with sweatshop conditions for many workers throughout our country. 

If your employer considers you a contractor, please indicate that in your comment and provide any appropriate details such as your job and what city or state you work in. 

Submit your comment by Sunday, October 25th, the comment period deadline. 

Client Reviews

★★★★★

A situation that involves attorneys is emotional - Mike Lore is an attentive listener and really helped me come to the terms of my situation. He used his understanding of the law to construct a case that was grounded in fact and skipped the needless 'finger-pointing' and 'he-said/she-said' back and forth. Mike's professionalism with me (the client) and the opposing attorney moved the case forward quickly with a successful result.

- E.S.

★★★★★

After talking to HR and trying to find answers to my questions about the overtime laws online, I was so confused. I contacted the firm and spoke to Stacy. She was so nice and took the time to review my pay stubs. She explained what the law requires and how it applied to my job. Turns out I do not have a case. Even though I didn’t have a case, she sent me a follow up email with even more information. So glad I called them.

- P.A.

★★★★★

We live in another state, but my husband's company sent him to work in Texas for 6 months. With the laws being completely different from our home state, it was nice to speak to a professional that could put us at ease and explain the laws to us.

- D.E.